theatlantic
theatlantic:

Why Do the Smartest Cities Have the Smallest Share of Cars?

Think cars are over in America? We do.
The Atlantic has called "peak car"—not once but twice. We have repeatedly explained why young Americans "don’t care about owning" a vehicle. We predicted a long-term decline of auto sales, and, in a dramatic moment, essentially announced "the end of car ownership," generally.
We had strong data. Perhaps we had strong biases, too.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Why Do the Smartest Cities Have the Smallest Share of Cars?

Think cars are over in America? We do.

The Atlantic has called "peak car"—not once but twice. We have repeatedly explained why young Americans "don’t care about owning" a vehicle. We predicted a long-term decline of auto sales, and, in a dramatic moment, essentially announced "the end of car ownership," generally.

We had strong data. Perhaps we had strong biases, too.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

taylorgrindley

ryanpanos:

Eidos | Carlo Bailey | Via

Located in east harlem, ‘eidos’ conceived by manhattan-based carlo bailey is an architect-free, prototypical self-sufficient community based sometime in the near future. the project is about managing difference and desire within a collective spatial condition. additive manufacturing technologies (seven axis robot – 3D printers) are employed to facilitate a housing complex that is the physical manifestation of its inhabitants wants. executed within a rigid rule-set of constraints, the design allows for maximum autonomy and expression. the rule-set consists of a series of algorithms, a DNA structure that is programmed into the robots, which feeds both environmental and human goals to enable the construction of units and infrastructure.

The organization of the complex aims to be as generic and uniform as possible. through analyzing the sun’s movement across the site, it helped to define the optimum placement of light wells and breaks in the grid – minimizing shadows and bringing light to the ground plane. cuts in the massing and grid are introduced to provide connections through to adjacent city blocks and extend manhattan’s layout. the market-place is located on the ground floor with the school lying on the two levels above. communal areas are strategically positioned adjacent to four vertical circulation cores and are intertwined with the housing units throughout the remaining complex.